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Full text of "Hymns and songs"

YMNS 



AND 



SONGS 



FRIENDS' GENERAL CONFERENCE 



HYMN FOR THE NATIONS 

Brother, shout your country's anthem, 
Sing your land's undying fame, 
Light the wondrous talc of nations 
With your people's golden name; 
Tell your father's noble story, 
Raise on high your country's sign; 
Join, then in the final glory - 
Brother, lift your flag with mine I 

Hail the sun of peace, now rising; 
Hold the war clouds closer furled; 
Blend your banners, my brother, 
In the rainbow of the world! 
Red as blood and blue as heaven, 
Wise as age and proud as youth, 
Melt your colors, wonder woven, 
In the great white light of truth I 

Build the road of Peace before us, 
Build it wide and deep and long; 
Speed the slow and check the eager, 
Help the weak and curb the strong. 
None shall push aside another, 
None shall let another fall; 
March beside me, my brother, 
All for one and one for all. 






4th & West 



OH HOLY NIGHT 



Oh holy night when Christ was born of Mary 
Calm o'er the world the stars their vigils keep 
Sleep, gentle Jesus, in thy lowly manger 
Naught can befall: Love f s angels guard thy sleep. 

Oh holy night when Christ was born of Mary 
Heaven f s gleaming stars look down to-night as then 
Spirit of Love we pray that now the Christ child 
Hay in our hearts be born and live again, 

ft. Ralph Gawthrop* 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/hymnssongsOOfrie 



Hymns and Songs 

FOREWORD 

The Friends' General Conference in 1923 instructed its Committee 
on First-day Schools to arrange for the printing of a small permanent 
collection of Hymns and Songs. The Conference of 1930 authorized the 
addition of several hymns to the new edition. This book includes the 
hymns previously issued with thirty-nine additional. The first edition met 
a generally favorable reception. It is impossible to issue a collection which 
will suit everybody. The fitness of the music, the sentiment expressed by 
the words, the freedom from burdensome copyright limitations are all 
factors in deciding upon the content of the book. The collection will not 
accord with any single person's judgment but we hope that Friends who 
sing will all find a reasonable amount of material suited to their purpose. 

A special committee named by the Conference by the authority of its 
superior Conference Committee, takes the final responsibility for the issue. 
It asks all Friends to consider the difficulties to be met in the effort to 
meet varied needs and different tastes. It asks especially that hymns not 
now familiar shall be learned and used. In no other way can Quakerism 
learn to express itself vitally in song. 

We were graciously accorded permission by John Haynes Holmes, 
Wm. P. Merrill, Wm. C. Gannett, Frederick L. Hosmer, Hollis Dann, Daniel 
Batchelor and Anna Garlin Spencer to use selections from their works. 
We acknowledge the special permission of Houghton Mifflin Co. to use the 
words from Henry W. Longfellow, Samuel Longfellow and John G. Whit- 
tier, of which they hold the copyright ; the permission of Charles Scribner's 
Sons for selections from Henry van Dyke; of the American Baptist Pub- 
lication Society for several of the children's songs published in "Childhood 
Songs" ; of the Survey Associates for certain hymns in their collection of 
"One Hundred Hymns of Brotherhood and Aspiration," and of publishers 
and holders of copyright as noted in each case. If we have inadvertently 
included any selection covered by copyright without the owner's permission 
we beg to be excused for the error. Care has been taken to trace the 
source of each hymn though it has not always met with success. 



PUBLISHED FOR 

FRIENDS GENERAL CONFERENCE 

By the Central Bureau of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting 

1515 Cherry Street, Philadelphia 

1931 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF FIRST LINES 



Abide with me 16 

All as God wills _ 127 

All beautiful the march of days 150 

All people that on earth do dwell 41 

All praise to Thee, my God 52 

All that's good and great and true 89 

All things bright and beautiful 76 

Another year is dawning 110 

Awake, my soul, and with the sun 25 

Away in a manger 155 

Be silent, be silent 114 

Behold us, Lord, a little space 101 

Blest be the tie that binds 99 

Breaks the joyful Easter dawn 122 

Brothers of every clime 102 

Calm on the listening ear of night 81 

Can a little child like me 36 

Carol, children, carol 79 

Carry the sunshine 120 

Christ in the heart and His love 108 

Come Master Workman, work with us 133 

Come, Thou almighty King 3 

Day by day the manna fell... 47 

Day is dying in the west 62 

Daylight from the sky has faded 60 

Dear Lord and Father of mankind 7 

Eternal One, Thou living God 58 

Eternal Source of every joy 151 

Fairest Lord Jesus 130 

Faith of our fathers ! living still 83 

Father, again to Thy dear name we raise 51 

Father, give Thy benediction 54 

Father in heaven 132 

Father in heaven, Who lovest all 93 

Father, let Thy blessing touch us 19 

Father, now our prayer is said 112 

Father, to us Thy children 94 

Father, we thank Thee for the night 38 

Father, whate'er of earthly bliss 53 

For the beauty of the earth 92 

Forward through . the ages 22 

From age to age they gather 135 

God is in His holy temple 10 

God is love ; His mercy brightens.....: 85 

God, make my life a little light 39 

God moves in a mysterious way 56 

God of our fathers 159 

God of our youth 137 

God of the nations, near and far 70 

God of the strong, God of the weak 65 

God send us men whose aim 'twill be 67 

God that madest earth and heaven 126 

Hail the hero workers... ~ 136 

Hark! the lilies whisper 113 

He hides within the lily 116 

Help us, O Thou gracious Father 63 

Holy, Holy, Holy 4 

Holy Spirit, Truth Divine _ „ 32, 45 



How gentle God's commands _ 42 

Hushed was the evening hymn 88 

I dimly guess from blessings known 86 

I heard the bells on Christmas day 30 

I would be true 138 

If any little word of mine 104 

Immortal Love, forever full 57 

In Christ there is no east or west 143 

In heavenly love abiding 128 

It came upon the midnight clear 29 

It swells upon the noon-day breeze 145 

Joy to the world! the Lord is come 117 

Joyful, joyful, we adore Thee _ 55 

Lead, kindly Light, amid th' encircling 1 

Lead us, O Father, in the paths of peace 97 

Light of the World, we hail Thee 129 

Little lambs so white and fair 78 

Lo, the earth is risen again 72 

Lord, as we Thy name profess _ 123 

Lord of all being, throned afar 40 

Lord of the Harvest 154 

Lord, speak to me, that I may speak 69 

Lord, we come before Thee now 105 

Love divine, all loves excelling 11 

Make large our hearts 141 

'Mid all the traffic of the ways 131 

My country! 'tis of thee (America) 31 

My God, how endless is Thy love 44 

My God, I thank Thee who hast made 149 

Mysterious Presence, Source of all 6 

Nearer, my God, to Thee 2 

Not alone for mighty empire 33 

Now the day is over 20 

O beautiful for spacious skies 73 

O brother man, fold to thy heart 140 

O come, all ye faithful 156 

O Father, Thou who givest all 59 

O God of gifts exceeding rare 74 

O God of Love, O King of Peace 103 

O have I seen the glory of the Lord 87 

O little town of Bethlehem 28 

O, love ! O life ! our faith and sight 13 

O Love that wilt not let me go 14 

O Master, let me walk with Thee 34 

O pure reformers ! Not in vain 61 

O sometimes gleams upon my sight 43 

O Son of Man, Thou madest known 134 

O still in accents sweet and strong 64 

O Thou not made with hands 24 

On our way rejoicing _ 21 

Once a little baby lay 119 

Once to every man and nation 109 

One by one the sands are flowing 115 

Our Father ! Thy dear name doth show 82 
Our God, our help in ages past 5 

Peace be to this congregation... 107 

Praise Him 160 

Praise the Lord : ye heavens adore Him 84 

Praise to God and thanksgiving 26 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF FIRST LINES 



Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky Ill 

Rise, my soul, and stretch thy wings 50 

Rise up, O men of God 100 

Silent night, holy night 157 

Softly now the light of day 18 

Spirit of God, descend upon my heart 125 

Still, still with Thee 91 

Strife at last is ended 146 

Strong Son of God, Immortal Love 124 

Take my life, and let it be 46 

"Thank Thee !" for the world so sweet 121 

The air is filled with the echoes 80 

The beautiful bright sunshine 148 

The blessed day is dawning 106 

The harp at Nature's advent strung 49 

The heavens declare Thy glory 152 

The King of love my Shepherd is 12 

The Lord is my Shepherd... 15 

The spring is come ! 11 

The still small voice that speaks within 95 
The voice of God is calling 142 



There's a bird that is flying (Spring) 37 

There's a wideness in God's mercy 35 

These things shall be 144 

They who tread the path of labor 66 

This is my Father's world 153 

To knights in the days of old 96 

To think and do right 161 

Unto the calmly gathered thought 9 

Watchman, tell us of the night 158 

We bear the strain of earthly care 139 

We may not climb the heavenly steeps 8 

We need love's tender lessons taught 71 

We plow the fields, and scatter 23 

We thank Thee, Lord, for this fair earth 147 

What Thou wilt, O Father, give 98 

When o'er earth is breaking (God is there) 75 

When shadows gather on our way 48 

When the mists have rolled in splendor... 90 

When thy heart, with joy o'er flowing 27 

Where cross the crowded ways of life 68 

While shepherds watched their flocks 118 

Work, for the night is coming 17 



INDEX ACCORDING TO SUBJECTS 



ASPIRATION 

Abide with me 16 

Awake, my soul, and with the sun 25 

Come, Thou almighty King 3 

Dear Lord and Father of mankind 7 

Father, to us thy children 94 

Father, whate'er of earthly bliss 53 

God is in His holy temple 10 

I would be true 138 

Lead us, O Father 97 

Lord, as we Thy name profess 123 

Lord, speak to me 69 

Mysterious Presence, Source of all 6 

Nearer, my God, to Thee 2 

O God of gifts, exceeding rare 74 

O I have seen the glory... 87 

O Love that will not let me go 14 

O Master, let me walk with Thee 34 

O Thou not made with hands 24 

Rise my soul, and stretch thy wings „.. 50 

Softly now the light of day 18 

Spirit of God, descend upon my heart 125 

Still, still with Thee , 91 

Strong Son of God, Immortal Love 124 

Take my life and let it be 46 

The still small voice that speaks within 95 

We may not climb the heavenly steeps 8 

What Thou wilt, O Father, give 98 

When shadows gather on our way 48 

LIGHT AND GUIDANCE 

All as God wills 127 

All people that on earth do dwell 41 

All that's good and great and true 89 

Be silent, be silent 114 

Blest be the tie that binds 99 



Day by day the manna fell 47 

Daylight from the sky has faded 60 

Father, now our prayer is said 112 

God is love, His mercy brightens 85 

God moves in a mysterious way 56 

God of the strong, God of the weak 65 

God that madest earth and heaven 126 

Help us, O Thou gracious Father „.. 63 

Holy, holy, holy 4 

Holy Spirit, Truth Divine 32, 45 

How gentle God's commands 42 

I dimly guess from blessings known 86 

In heavenly love abiding 128 

Joyful, joyful, we adore Thee 55 

Lead, kindly Light, amid the encircling 1 

Light of the world, we hail thee 129 

Lord of all being, throned afar 40 

Love divine, all loves excelling 11 

My God, how endless is Thy love 44 

Now the day is over 20 

O love! O life! Our faith and sight 13 

On our way rejoicing 21 

One by one the sands are flowing 115 

Our God, our help in ages past 5 

The King of love my Shepherd is 12 

The Lord is my Shepherd 15 

There's a wideness in God's mercy 35 

We need love's tender lessons taught 71 

When the mists have rolled in splendor 90 

WORSHIP 

Behold us, Lord, a little space 101 

Day is dying in the west 62 

Dear Lord and Father of mankind 7 

Fairest Lord Jesus _.. 130 

Father, again to Thy dear name 51 

Father, give thy benediction 54 



INDEX ACCORDING TO SUBJECTS 



Father in heaven - _.. 132 

Father, let thy blessing touch us ~ 19 

God is in His holy temple 10 

Hushed was the evening hymn 88 

Immortal Love, forever full 57 

Lord, we come .before Thee now 105 

Mid all the traffic of the ways 131 

Praise the Lord, ye heavens, adore Him 84 
Unto the calmly gathered thought 9 

TORCHBEARERS 

Come Master Workman, work with us 133 

Faith of our Fathers, living still „ 83 

Forward through the ages 22 

From age to age they gather 135 

God of our youth 137 

God send us men, whose aim 'twill be 67 

Hail the hero workers _ 136 

I would tie true 138 

O pure reformers, not in vain 61 

O Son of Man, Thou madest known 134 

O still in accents sweet and strong 64 

To knights in the days of old 96 

Work for the night is coming... 17 

SOCIAL JUSTICE 

Eternal One, Thou living God 58 

Father in heaven, Who lovest all 93 

In Christ there is no east or west 143 

Make large our hearts _ _ 141 

Not alone for mighty empire 33 

O brother man, fold to thy heart 140 

O sometimes gleams upon my sight 43 

Once to every man and nation 109 

Our Father! Thy dear name doth show 82 

Rise up, O men of God 100 

The voice of God is calling 142 

These things shall be 144 

They who tread the path of labor 66 

We bear the strain of earthly care 139 

When thy heart, with joy o'ernowing 27 

Where cross the crowded ways of life 68 

PEACE 

Brothers of every clime _._ 102 

Christ in the heart and His love 108 

Father, again to Thy dear name we raise 51 

God of the nations, near and far 70 

It swells upon the noon-day breeze 145 

O God of love, O King of peace 103 

Peace be to this congregation 107 

Strife at last is ended 146 

The blessed day is dawning „.„ 106 

THE BEAUTY OF THE EARTH 

All beautiful the march of days 150 

Eternal source of every joy „ 151 

For the beauty of the earth 92 

Hark the lilies whisper 113 

He hides within the lily 116 

My God, I thank Thee who hast made 149 

Praise to God and thanksgiving 26 

The beautiful, bright sunshine 148 

The harp at nature's advent strung _ 49 

The heavens declare Thy glory 152 

This is my Father's World 153 



We plow the fields and scatter _ _ 23 

We thank Thee, Lord, for this fair earth 147 

EVENING 

All praise to Thee, my God.~ 

Day is dying in the west 

Daylight from the sky has faded... 

Now the day is over _„ 

Softly now the light of day 

FATHERLAND 

God of our Fathers _ 

My country, 'tis of thee 



52 
62 
60 
20 
18 

159 
31 
73 



O beautiful for spacious skies 

SPECIAL DAYS 

New Year's: 

Another year is dawning 110 

Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky. Ill 

Easter : 

Breaks the joyful Easter dawn 122 

Hark! the lilies whisper - 113 

He hides within the lily _ 116 

Lo, the earth is risen again _ 72 

Praise to God and thanksgiving. _ 26 

Thanksgiving: 

Lord of the Harvest 154 

Not alone for mighty empire 33 

Father, Thou who givest all 59 

Praise to God and thanksgiving 26 

We plow the fields, and scatter 23 

When thy heart, with joy o'ernowing. 27 

Christmas : 

Away in a manger _ 155 

Calm on the listening ear of night 81 

Carol, children, carol _ - 79 

1 heard the bells on Christmas day 30 

It came upon the midnight clear 29 

Joy to the world! The Lord is come 117 

O come, all ye faithful 156 

O little town of Bethlehem 28 

Once a little baby lay - 119 

Silent night, holy night _ 157 

The air is filled with the echoes 80 

Watchman, tell us of the night 158 

While shepherds watched their flocks 118 

PRIMARY CHILDREN 

All things bright and beautiful 76 

Away in a manger 155 

Be silent, be silent 114 

Can a little child like me 36 

Carry the sunshine 120 

Father, we thank Thee for the night 38 

God, make my life a little light 39 

Hark! the lilies whisper _ 113 

If any little word of mine 104 

Little lambs so white and fair „...._ 78 

Once a little baby lay 119 

Praise Him _ 160 

Thank Thee ! for the world so sweet 121 

The spring is come ! 77 

The still small voice that speaks within 95 

There's a bird that is flying (Spring) 37 

To think and do right 161 

When o'er earth is breaking ( God is there) 75 



Lead, Kindly Light 



Lux Benigna 



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Holy, holy, holy! Merciful and Mighty! 
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Our hope for years to come ; 
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And our eternal home ! 

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Withhold Thy light and love and power. 

3 Thy hand unseen to accents clear 

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With flame from Thine own altar-fire. 

4 Thy touch divine still, Lord, impart, 
Still give the prophet's burning word ; 
And vocal in each waiting heart 
Let living psalms of praise be heard. 

Seth C. Beach, 186fr 



Dear Lord and Father of Mankind 



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2 In simple trust like theirs who heard, 

Beside the Syrian sea, 
The gracious calling of the Lord, 
Let us, like them, without a word 

Rise up and follow Thee. 

3 O Sabbath rest by Galilee! 

O calm of hills above, 
Where Jesus knelt to share with Thee 
The silence of eternity 

Interpreted by love ! 



4 Drop Thy still dews of quietness, 

Till all our strivings cease : 
Take from our souls the strain and stress, 
And let our ordered lives confess 

The beauty of Thy peace. 

5 Breathe through the heats of our desire 

Thy coolness and Thy balm ; 
Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire ; 
Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire, 

O still, small voice of calm. 

John G. Whittier. 1872 



8 



We May Not Climb the Heavenly Steeps 



Serenity 






Arr. from William V. Wallace, 1856 

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And faith has still its Olivet, 
And love its Galilee. 

3 The healing of the seamless dress 

Is by our beds of pain; 



We touch Him in life's throng and press, 
And we are whole again. 

4 Our Lord and Master of us all, 
Whate'er our name or sign, 
We own Thy sway, we hear Thy call, 
We test our lives by Thine. 

John G. Whittier, 1866 



Unto the Calmly Gathered Thought 



Federal Street 



Henry K. Oliver, 1832 



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Salvation from our selfishness ; 
From sin itself, and not the pain 
That warns us of its chafing chain 



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4 That God is near us now as when 
He spake in old-time faith and men ; 
That the dear Christ dwells not afar 
The King of some remoter star, 



3 That worship's deeper meaning lies 
In mercy, and not sacrifice, 
Not proud humilities of sense, 
But love's unforced obedience; 



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The bound and suffering of our kind, 
In works we do, in prayers we pray, 
Within our lives He lives to-day. 

John G. Whittier, 1868 

God is in His Holy Temple 

Genevan Psalter, 1551 

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2 God is in His holy temple, 
In the pure and holy mind ; 
In the reverent heart and simple ; 
In the soul from sense refined. 



Then let every low emotion 

Banished far and silent be, 
And our souls in pure devotion, 

Lord, be temples worthy Thee ! 

Anon ( Hymns of the Spirit ) 1864 



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Love Divine, All Loves Excelling 



John Zundel, 1870 



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Into every troubled breast ! 
Let us all in Thee inherit, 
Let us find the promised rest. 



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Come, Almighty to deliver, 
Let us all Thy life receive ; 

Suddenly return, and never, 
Never more Thy temples leave. 

Charles Wesley,. 1747, alt. 



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The King of Love My Shepherd Is 



Dominus Regit Me 



John B. Dykes, 1868 



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2 Where streams of living water flow, 

My rescued soul He leadeth, 
And, where the verdant pastures grow, 
With food celestial feedeth. 

3 Perverse and foolish oft I strayed, 

But yet in love He sought me, 
And on His shoulder gently laid 
And home, rejoicing brought me. 



4 In death's dark Vale I fear no ill 

With Thee, dear Lord, beside me ; 
Thy rod and staff my comfort still, 
Thy hands and touch to guide me. 

5 And so through all the length of days, 

Thy goodness faileth never ; 
Good Shepherd, may I sing Thy praise 
Within Thy house forever. 

Henry W. Baker, 1868, alt. 



13 



O, Love! O, Life! Our Faith and Sight 



Materna 



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We faintly hear, we dimly see, 

In differing phrase we pray, 
But, dim or clear, we own in Thee 

The Light, the Truth, the Way ; 
And Thou art Master of us all, 

Whate'er our name or sign ; 
We own Thy sway, we hear Thy call, 

We test our lives by Thine. 



Our Friend, our Brother, and our Guide, 

What may Thy service be ? 
Nor name, nor form, nor ritual pride, 

But simply following Thee. 
Thy litanies, sweet offices 

Of love and gratitude ; 
Thy sacramental liturgies, 

The joy of doing good. 

John G. Whittier, 1866, alt. 



14 



Love That Wilt Not Let Me Go 



St. Margaret 



Albert L. Peace, 1885 




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2 O Light that followest all my way, 

I yield my flickering torch to Thee 
My heart restores its borrowed ray, 
That in Thy sunshine's blaze its day 

May brighter, fairer, be. 

3 O Joy that seekest me through pain, 

I cannot close my heart to Thee ; 
I trace the rainbow through the rain, 



And feel the promise is not vain 
That morn shall tearless be. 

4 O Cross that liftest up my head, 
I dare not ask to fly from Thee ; 
I lay in dust life's glory dead, 
And from the ground there blossoms red 
Life that shall endless be. 

George Matheson, 1882 



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2 Through the valley and shadow of death though I stray, 

Since Thou art my Guardian, no evil I fear; 

Thy rod shall defend me, Thy staff be my stay; 

No harm can befall, with my Comforter near. 

3 In the midst of affliction my table is spread; 

With blessing unmeasured my cup runneth o'er; 
With perfume and oil Thou anointest my head; 
O what shall I ask of Thy providence more? 

4 Let goodness and mercy, my bountiful God, 

Still follow my steps till I meet Thee above; 
I seek, by the path which my" forefathers trod 
Through the land of their sojourn, Thy kingdom of love. 

James Montgomery, 

Abide with Me 

William H. Monk, 



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Swift to its close ebbs out life's little day; 
Earth's joy grows dim, its glories pass away: 
Change arid decay in all around I see; 

Thou who changest not, abide with me. 

1 need Thy presence every passing hour; 

What but Thy grace can foil the tempter's power? 

Who like Thyself my guide and stay can be? 

Through cloud and sunshine, O abide with me. 

I fear no foe, with Thee at hand to bless; 

Ills have no weight, and tears no bitterness. 

Where is death's sting? where, grave, thy victory? 

I triumph still, if Thou abide with me. 

Hold Thou Thy cross before my closing eyes; 

Shine through the gloom, and point me to the skies : 

Heaven's morning breaks, and earth's vain shadows flee: 

In life, in death, O Lord, abide with me. 

Henry F. Lyte, 1847 



17 



Work Song 



Work, for the Night is Coming 



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Work through the sunny noon ; 
Fill brightest hours with labor, 

Rest comes sure and soon. 
Give every flying minute 

Something to keep in store : 
Work, for the night is coming, 

When man works no more. 



Work, for the night is coming, 

Under the sunset skies ; 
While their bright tints are glowing, 

Work, for daylight flies. 
Work till the last beam fadeth, 

Fadeth to shine no more ; 
Work while the night is darkening, 

When man's work is over. 

Anna L. Coghill, 1861, alt. 



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Softly Now the Light of Day 

Arr. from Carl M. von Weber, 1826 



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3 Soon, for me, the light of day 
Shall forever pass away ; 
Then, from sin and sorrow free, 
Take me, Lord, to dwell with Thee. 
G. W. Doane, 1824 

Father, Let Thy Blessing Touch Us 

Joseph Barnby, 1868 



2 Thou, whose all-pervading eye, 
Naught escapes without, within, 
Pardon each infirmity, 
Open fault, and secret sin. 



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Merrial 



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Father, keep us loving, 
Brave and true and free, 

Kind to every creature, — 
All belong to Thee. 

Unto all Thy children, 
Here and everywhere, 

Father, give the comfort 
Of Thy loving care. 

Althea A. Ogden 



20 



1 Now the day is over, 

Night is drawing nigh ; 
Shadows of the evening 
Steal across the sky : 

2 Now the darkness gathers, 

Stars begin to peep, 
Birds and beasts and flowers 
Soon will be asleep. 



Now the Day is Over 

Tune— Merrial (See above) 

3 Father, give the weary 5 

Calm and sweet repose ; 

With Thy tenderest blessing 

May mine eyelids close. 

4 Grant to little children 

Visions bright of Thee ; 
Guard the sailors tossing 

On the deep blue sea. 
When the morning wakens, 

Then may I arise 
Pure, and fresh, and sinless 

In' Thy holy eyes. 

Sabine Baring Gould 



Comfort every sufferer 

Watching late in pain ; 
Those who plan some evil 

From their sin restrain. 
6 Thro' the long night-watches, 

May Thine angels spread 
Their white wings above me, 

Watching round my bed. 



1865 



21 



St. Gertrude 



On Our Way Rejoicing 



Arthur S. Sullivan, 1871 




1. On our way re - joic - ing, 



As we homeward move, Hearken to our prais - es, 



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Thou who giv'st the seedtime, 

Wilt give large increase, 
Crown the head with blessings, 

Fill the heart with peace. — Ref. 

John S. B. Monsell, 1863 



2 If with honest-hearted 
Love for God and man, 
Day by day Thou find us 
Doing what we can ; 



22 



Forward Through the Ages 



Tune— St. Gertrude 

1 Forward through the ages, 

In unbroken line, 
Move the faithful spirits 

At the call divine : 
Gifts in differing measure, 

Hearts of one accord, 
Manifold the service, 
One the sure reward. 
REF. — Forward through the ages, 
In unbroken line, 
Move the faithful spirits 
At the call divine. 

2 Wider grows the kingdom, 

Reign of love and light ; 



(See above) 

For it we must labor, 

Till our faith is sight. 
Prophets have proclaimed it, 

Martyrs testified, 
Poets sung its glory, 

Heroes for it died. — Ref. 

3 Not alone we conquer, 
Not alone we fall ; 
In each loss or triumph 

Lose or triumph all. 
Bound by God's far purpose 

In one living whole, 
Move we on together 
To the shining goal !— Ref. 

Frederick L. Hosmer, 1908 



23 



We Plow the Fields and Scatter 



Claudius 



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2 He only is the Maker 

Of all things near and far ; 
He paints the wayside flower, 

He lights the evening star; 
The winds and waves obey Him ; 

By Him the birds are fed ; 
Much more to us, His children, 

He gives our daily bread. — Ref. 



3 We thank Thee, then, O Father, 
For all things bright and good, 
The seed-time and the harvest, 
Our life, our health, our food. 
No gifts have we to offer 

For all Thy love imparts, 
But that which Thou desirest, — 
Our humble, thankful hearts. — REF. 
M. Claudius, 1782. Tr. Jane M. Campbell. 1861 



24 



Thou Not Made with Hands 



Laudes Domini 



Joseph Barnby, 1868 




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framed with stones of price, More bright than gold or gem, God's own Je 



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Where martyrs win their crown, 
Where faithful souls possess 
Themselves in perfect peace. 
4 Not throned above the skies, 

Not golden-walled afar, 
But where Christ's two or three 

In His Name gathered are, 
Be in the midst of them, 
God's own Jerusalem. 

Francis T. Palgrave, 1867 

and With the Sun 

Francois H. Barthelemon, 1791 



2 Where'er the gentle heart 

Finds courage from above, 
Where'er the heart forsook 

Warms with the breath of love, 
Where faith bids fear depart, 
City of God, thou art. 

3 Thou art where'er the proud 

In humbleness melts down, 
Where self itself yields up, 

25 Awake, My Soul, 

Morning Hymn 



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2 By influence of the light Divine, 
Let thy own light to others shine; 
Reflect all heaven's propitious rays 
In ardent love and cheerful praise. 

3 Lord, I my vows to Thee renew ; 
Disperse my sins as morning dew ; 



Guard my first springs of thought and will. 

And with Thyself my spirit fill. 

Direct, control, suggest, this day, 

All I design, or do, or say, 

That all my powers with all their might 

In Thy sole glory may unite. 

Thomas Ken. Text of 1709 



26 



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3 Praise Him now for snowy rest, 
Falling soft on Nature's breast ; 
Praise for happy dreams of birth ; 
Brooding in the quiet earth ! 
For His year of wonder done, 
Praise to the All-Glorious One! 
Hearts, bow down, and voices, sing 
Praise and love and thanksgiving ! 
William C, Gannett. 



2 Praise Him for His summer rain, 
Feeding, day and night, the grain 
Praise Him for His tiny seed, 
Holding all His world shall need ! 
Praise Him for His garden root, 
Meadow grass and orchard fruit: 
Praise for hills and valleys broad, 
Each the Table of the Lord! 



27 



When Thy Heart, With Joy O'erflowing 



Geneva (Bullinger) 



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2 When the harvest-sheaves ingathered 

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To thy God and to thy brother 
Give the ; more. 

3 Jf thy soul, with power uplifted, 

Yearn for glorious deed, 
Give thy strength to serve thy brother 
In his need. 



28 



4 Hast thou borne a secret sorrow 
In thy lonely breast? 

Take to thee thy sorrowing brother 
For a guest. 

5 Share with him thy bread of blessing, 
Sorrow's burden share ; 

When thy heart enfolds a brother, 
God is there, 

Theodore C. Williams, 1891 



O Little Town of Bethlehem 



St. Louis 



Lewis H. Redner, 






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No ear may hear His coming; 

But in this world of* sin. 
Where meek souls will receive Him still, 

The dear Christ enters in. 

4 O holy Child of Bethlehem ! 
Descend to us, we pray; 
Cast out our sin and enter in, — 

Be born in us to-day f 
We hear the Christmas angels 
The great glad tidings tell, — 
Oh, come to us, abide with us, 
Our Lord Emmanuel ! 

Phillips Brooks, 1868 



2 For Christ is born of Mary ; 

And gathered all above, 
While mortals sleep, the angels keep 

Their watch of wondering love. 
O morning stars, together 

Proclaim the holy birth, 
And praises sing to God the King, 

And peace to men on earth ! 

3 How silently, how silently 

The wondrous gift is given ! 

So God imparts to human hearts 

The blessings of His heaven. 



29 



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Richard S. Willis, 1850 



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3 But with the woes of sin and strife 
The world has suffered long ; 

Beneath the angel -strain have rolled 
Two thousand years of wrong ; 

And man, at war with man, hears not 
The love song which they bring : 

O hush the noise, ye men of strife, 
And hear the angels sing ! 

4 And ye, beneath life's crushing load, 
Whose forms are bending low, 

Who toil along the climbing way 
With painful steps and slow, 



Still through the cloven skies they come 

With peaceful wings unfurled, 
And still their heavenly music floats 

O'er all the weary world ; 
Above its sad and lowly plains 

They bend on hovering wing, 
And ever o'er its Babel sounds 

The blessed angels sing. 

Look now ! for glad and golden hours 

Come swiftly on the wing : 
O rest beside the weary road, 

And hear the angels sing ! 
For lo ! the days are hastening on 

By prophet-bards foretold, 
When with the ever-circling years 

Comes round the age of gold ; 
When peace shall over all the earth 

Its ancient splendors fling. 
And the whole world send back the song 

Which now the angels sing. 

Edmund Hamilton Sears, 1846 



30 



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I Heard the Bells On Christmas Day 

Psalmodia Evangelica, 1789 



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2 I thought how, as the day had come, 
The belfries of all Christendom 
Had rolled along the unbroken song 
Of peace on earth, goodwill to men,— 

3 And in despair I bowed my head : 

V There is no peace on earth," I said, 
" For hate is strong, and mocks the song 
Of peace on earth, goodwill to men." 



4 Then pealed the bells more loud and deep ; 
" God is not dead, nor doth He sleep ; 
The Wrong shall fail, the Right prevail, 
With peace on earth, goodwill to men : " 

5 Till, ringing, singing on its way, 

The world revolved from night to day, 
A voice, a chime, a chant sublime, 
Of peace on earth, goodwill to men ! 

Henry W. Longfellow, 1864 



31 



America 



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2 My native country, thee, 
Land of the noble free, 

Thy name I love ; 
I love thy rocks and rills, 
Thy woods and templed hills, 
My heart with rapture thrills 

Like that above. 

3 Let music swell the breeze, 
And ring from all the trees 

Sweet freedom's song : 
£et mortal tongues awake, 



Let all that breathe partake, 
Let rocks their silence break, 
The sound prolong. 

4 Our fathers' God, to Thee, 
Author of liberty, 

To Thee we sing : 
Long may our land be bright 
With freedom's holy light ; 
Protect us by Thy might, 
Great God, our King. 

Samuel F. Smith, 



32 



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Ad. from Johann A. Freylinghausen 
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2 Holy Spirit, Love divine ! 
Glow within this heart of mine ; 
Kindle every high desire, 
Perish self in Thy pure fire. 

3 Holy Spirit, Power divine ! 

Fill and nerve this will of mine; 
By Thee may I strongly live, 
Bravely bear, and nobly strive. 



4 Holy Spirit, Right divine ! 

King within my conscience reign ; 
Be my law, and I shall be 
Firmly bound, forever free. 

5 Holy Spirit, Peace divine! 

Still this restless heart of mine ; 
Speak to calm this tossing sea, 
Stayed in Thy tranquility. 



6 Holy Spirit, Joy divine! 
Gladden Thou this heart of mine; 
In the desert ways I sing, 
"Spring, O Well, forever spring!" 

Samuel Longfellow, 1864 



33 



Not Alone for Mighty Empire 



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For the people's prophet-leaders, 

Loyal to Thy living word, — 
For all heroes of the spirit, 

Give we thanks to Thee, O Lord. 
4 God of justice, save the people 

From the war of race and creed, 
From the strife of class and faction, — 

Make our nation free indeed ; 
Keep her faith in simple manhood 

Strong as when her life began, 
Till it find its full fruition 

In the Brotherhood of Man ! 

William P. Merrill 

Walk with Thee 

H. Percy Smith, 1874 
! fv I I i 



2 Not for battleships and fortress, 

Not for conquests of the sword, 
But for conquests of the spirit 

Give we thanks to Thee, O Lord ; 
For the heritage of freedom, 

For the home, the church, the school, 
For the open door to manhood 

In the land the people rule. 

3 For the armies of the faithful 

Lives that passed and left no name; 
For the glory that illumines 
Patriot souls of deathless fame ; 

Used by permission of " The Continent " 

34 O Master, Let Me 

Maryton 



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2 Help me the slow of heart to move 
By some clear, winning word of love ; 
Teach me the wayward feet to stay, 
And guide them in the homeward way. 

3 Teach me Thy patience ; still with Thee 
In closer, dearer company, 



In work that keeps faith sweet and strong, 

In trust that triumphs over wrong. 

In hope that sends a shining ray 

Far down the future's broadening way ; 

In peace that only Thou canst give, 

With Thee, Master, let me live. 

Washington Gladden, 1879 



35 



Galilee 



There's a Wideness in God's Mercy 

William H. Jude, 188? 



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2 For the love of God is broader 

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And the heart of the Eternal 
Is most wonderfully kind. 



3 If our love were but more simple, 
We should take Him at His word. 
And our lives would be all sunshine 
In the sweetness of our Lord. 

Frederick W. Faber, 1862 Cento 



36 



Can a Little Child Like Me 



W. K. Bassford, c. 1886 



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Can a Little Child Like Me— Concluded 



Refrain 




Fa- ther, we thank Thee, Father, we thank Thee, Father in heav-en, we thank Thee. 




For the fruit upon the tree, 
For the birds that sing of Thee, 
For the earth in beauty drest, 
Father, Mother, and the rest ; 
For Thy precious, loving care, 
For Thy bounty everwhere.— -Ref. 

For the sunshine warm and bright, 
For the day and for the night ; 
For the lessons of our youth, 



Honor, gratitude, and truth ; 
For the love that met us here, 
For the home and for the cheer.- 



-Ref. 



37 



Spring 



For our comrades and our plays, 
And our happy holidays ; 
For the joyful work and true, 
That a little child may do ; 
For our lives but just begun ; 
For the great gift of Thy Son.— Ref. 
Mrs. Mary Mapes Dodge 



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More frail and more tidy you scarcely would find, 
It says as it sends its brave glances around 
Give thanks to the Father, our Father so kind. 

3 O children who listen, O children who hear, 

Like birds and like flowers give thanks for the Spring, 
'Tis God who directs ev'ry change in the year, 
Give thanks to the Father, to Him we will sing. 

M. R. 



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38 



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Father, We Thank Thee For the Night 

D. Batchellor, 1880 



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2 Help us to do the things we should, 
To be to others kind and good; 
In all we do, in work or play, 
To love Thee better day by day. 

Rebecca J. Weston 
From "Songs and Games for Little Ones," by arr. with Oliver Ditson Company. 

God, Make My Life a Little Light 

D. Batchellor, c. 1878 



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2 God, make my life a little flower, 

That giveth joy to all, 
Content to bloom in native bower, 
Although the place be small.— Cho. 

3 God, make my life a little staff, 

Whereon the weak may rest, 
That so what health and strength I have, 
May serve my neighbor best.— Cho. 



I 

God, make my life a little song, 

That comforteth the sad, 
That helpeth others to be strong, 

And makes the singer glad.— Cho. 
God, make my life a little hymn 

Of tenderness and praise, — 
Of faith that never waxeth dim 

In all His wondrous ways. — Cho. 

Mrs. Edwards 



40 



Lord of All Being, Throned Afar 



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2 Sun of our life, thy quickening ray 
Sheds on our path the glow of day; 
Star of our hope, thy softened light 
Cheers the long watches of the night. 



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Before Thy ever-blazing throne 
We ask no lustre of our own. 



3 Lord of all life, below, above, 

Whose light is truth, whose warmth is love, 



4 Grant us Thy truth to make us free, 
And kindling hearts that burn for Thee ; 
Till a!l Thy living altars claim 
One holy light, one heavenly flame. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes, 1848 



41 All People that on Earth do Dwell 

Old Hundredth Genevan Psalter, 1551, alt. 



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2 The Lord ye know is God indeed ; 

Without our aid He did us make ; 
We are His folk, He doth us feed ; 
And for His sheep He doth us take. 

3 O enter then His gates with praise, 

Approach with joy His courts unto; 



Praise, laud, and bless His name always, 
For it is seemly so to do. 

For why? the Lord our God is good, 

His mercy is for ever sure ; 
His truth at all times firmly stood, 

And shall from age to age endure. 
William Kethe, 1561 



42 



Dennis 



How Gentle God's Commands 

Arr. from Hans G. Nageli, by Lowell Mason, 1845 



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2 While Providence supports, 

Let saints securely dwell ; 
That hand, which bears all nature up, 
Shall guide His children well. 

3 Why should this anxious load 

Press down your weary mind? 



Haste to your heavenly Father's throne, 
And sweet refreshment find. 

4 His goodness stands approved, 
Down to the present day ; 
I'll drop my burden at His feet, 
And bear a song away. 

Philip Dodddrige, publ. 1755 



43 



O Sometimes Gleams Upon My Sight 



Beethoven 



Arr. from Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 -1827 1 



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Thro' present wrong th' e-ter-nal Right ! And, 

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see the stead-y gain of man. 

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That all of good the past hath had 
Remains to make our own time glad, 
Our common daily life divine, 
And every land a Palestine. 

Through the harsh noises of our day 
A low, sweet prelude finds its way ; 



Through clouds of doubt and creeds of fear 
A light is breaking, calm and clear. 

4 Henceforth my heart shall sigh no more 
For olden time and holier shore ; 
God's love and blessing, then and there, 
Are now and here and everywhere. 

John G. Whittier, 1851, 1st line alt. 



44 



My God, How Endless is Thy Love 



Winchester New- 



Alt, from " Musikalisches Handbuch," Hamburg, 1690 



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2 Thou spread'st the curtains of the night, 
Great Guardian of my sleeping hours : 
Thy sovereign word restores the light, 
And quickens all my drowsy powers. 



3 I yield my powers to Thy command, 
To Thee I consecrate my days ; 
Perpetual blessings from Thy hand 
Demand perpetual songs of praise. 
Isaac Watts, 1709 



45 



Holy Spirit, Truth Divine 



Solitude 



Lewis T. Dowries, 1851 



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Perish self in thy pure fire ! 



3 Holy Spirit, Power divine ! 
Fill and nerve this will of mine ; 
By thee may I strongly live, 
Bravely bear, and nobly strive. 

Samuel Longfellow, 1864 



46 



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Take My Life, and Let It Be 

Arr. from Georg C. Strattner, by J. A. Freylinghausen, 1705 



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2 Take my hands, and let them move 
At the impulse of Thy love. 

Take my feet, and let them be 
Swift and beautiful for Thee. 

3 Take my voice, and let me sing, 
Always, only, for my King. 



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Take my lips, and let them be 
Filled with messages from Thee. 

4 Take my love ; my Lord, I pour 
At Thy feet its treasure-store. 
Take myself, and I will be 
Ever, only, all for Thee. 

Frances R. Havergal, 1874 



47 



Woodward's Litany 



Day By Day the Manna Fell 

William W. Woodward, 1863 




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Cast foreboding fears away, 
Take the manna of to-day. 

3 Lord, my times are in Thy hand ; 
All my sanguine hopes have planned 



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To Thy wisdom I resign, 

And would make Thy purpose mine. 

4 Thou my daily task shalt give ; 
Day by day to Thee I live; 
So shall added years fulfill, 
Not my own, my Father's will. 

Josiah Conder, 1836 



48 



When Shadows Gather on Our Way 



St. Cuthbert 



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2 Amid the outward toil and strife, 

The world's dull roar and din, 
Still speak thy word of higher life, 
Thou Voice within ! 

3 When burdens sore upon us press, 

And vexing cares increase, 



Spring thou, a fount of quietness, 
Our hidden Peace ! 

4 Though fond hopes fail, and joy depart, 
And friends should faithless prove, 
O save us from the bitter heart, 
Indwelling Love ! 

Frederick L. Hosmer 



49 



The Harp at Nature's Advent Strung. 



Balerma 



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2 And prayer is made, and praise is given, 

By all things near and far : 
The ocean looketh up to heaven 
And mirrors every star. 

3 The green earth sends her incense up 

From many a mountain shrine ; 



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From folded leaf and dewy cup 
She pours her sacred wine. 

4 So Nature keeps the reverent frame 
With which her years began, 
And all her signs and voices shame 
The prayerless heart of man. 

John G. Whittier, 1867 



50 



Rise, My Soul, and Stretch Thy Wings 

Amsterdam " The Foundery Collection, 

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So my soul, derived from God, 
Pants to view His glorious face, 

Forward tends to His abode, 
To rest in His embrace. 

Robert Seagrave, 1742 



2 Rivers to the ocean run, 

Nor stay in all their course ; 
Fire ascending seeks the sun ; 
Both speed them to their source : 



51 Father, Again to Thy Dear Name We Raise 

Ellers Edward J. Hopkins, 



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2 Grant us Thy peace upon our homeward way; 
With Thee began, with Thee shall end the day; 
Guard Thou the lips from sin, the hearts from shame, 
That in this house have called upon Thy name. 

3 Grant us Thy peace throughout our earthly life, 
Our balm in sorrow and our stay in strife; 
Then when Thy voice shall bid our conflict cease, 
Call us, O Lord, to Thine eternal peace! 

John Ellerton, 1866, alt. (text of 1868) 

All Praise to Thee, My God, This Night 



52 



Tallis's Evening Hymn 



Alt. from Thomas Tallis, 1560 



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2 O may my soul on Thee repose, 

And with sweet sleep mine eyelids close; 
Sleep that may me more vigorous make 
To serve my God when I awake. 



3 When in the night I sleepless lie, 

My soul with heavenly thoughts supply : 
Let no ill dreams disturb my rest, 
No powers of darkness me molest. 
Bishop Thomas Ken, 1693 text of 1709) 



53 



Father, Whate'er of Earthly Bliss 



Naomi 




Arr. from Hans G. Nageli, by Lowell Mason, 1836 



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2 Give me a calm, a thankful heart, 
From every murmur free ; 
The blessings of Thy grace impart, 
And make me live to Thee. 



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3 Let the sweet hope that Thou art mine 
My life and death attend ; 
Thy presence through my journey shine, 
And crown my journey's end. 
Anne Steele, 1760 ; alt. A. M. Toplady, 1776 



54 



Father, Give Thy Benediction 



Vesper Hymn 



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_ j Samuel Longfellow 

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The Hymn to Joy 



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All Thy works with joy surround Thee, 

Earth and heaven reflect Thy rays, 
Stars and angels sing around Thee, 

Center of unbroken praise : 
Field and forest, vale and mountain, 

Blossoming meadow, flashing sea, 
Chanting bird and flowing fountain, 

Call us to rejoice in Thee. 



3 Thou art giving and forgiving, 
Ever blessing, ever blest, 
Well-spring of the joy of living 

Ocean-depth of happy rest ! 
Thou the Father, Christ our Brother, 

All who live in love are Thine: 
Teach us how to love each other, 
Lift us to the Joy Divine. 

Henry Van Dyke, 1907 
From "Poems of Henry van Dyke." Copyright, 1911, by Charles Scribner's Sons. By permission of the publishers 



56 



God Moves in a Mysterious Way 



Hermon 




_Lowell Mason, 1832 

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2 Ye fearful souls, fresh courage take ! 

The clouds ye so much dread 
Are big with mercy, and shall break 
In blessings on your head. 

3 Judge not the Lord by feeble sense, 

But trust Him for His grace ; 



Behind a frowning providence 
He hides a smiling face. 
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4 Blind unbelief is sure to err, 
And scan His work in vain ; 
God is His own interpreter, 
And He will make it plain. 

William Cowper, 1774 



57 



Immortal Love 



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Our outward lips confess the Name 

All other names above ; 
Love only knoweth whence it came, 

And comprehendeth Love. 



3 The letter fails, and systems fall, 
And every symbol wanes; 
The Spirit over-brooding all, 
Eternal Love, remains. 

John G. Whittier, 1866 



58 



Eternal One, Thou Living God 



Waltham 



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The advancing thought, the widening view, 
The larger freedom, clearer sight, 
Which from the old unfolds the new, 



3 Anew we pledge our lives to Thee 

To follow where Thy Truth shall lead : 
Afloat upon its boundless sea, 
Who sails with God is safe indeed ! 
Samuel Longfellow 



59 



Father, Thou Who Givest All 



Duke Street 



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2 We thank Thee for the grace of home, 

For mother's love and father's care ; 
For friends and teachers— all who come 
Our joys and hopes and fears to share. 

3 For eyes to see and ears to hear, 

For hands to serve and arms to lift, 



For shoulders broad and strong to bear, 
For feet to run on errands swift, 

4 For faith to conquer doubt and fear, 
For love to answer every call, 
For strength to do, and will to dare, 
We thank Thee, O Thou Lord of all! 
John Haynes Holmes, 1908 



60 




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Daylight from the Sky Has Faded 

Daniel Batchelior, 1875 



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Lift their heads, refreshed with dew, 
Weary hearts look up to heaven, 

There to find their strength anew ; 
Thus we thirst for Thee, O Lord ; 
Let Thy grace on us be poured, 
Cleanse and pardon and restore us 
Shed the dew of blessing o'er us. 



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Babes, their trustful eyelids closing, 
Slumber on their mother's breast ; 
Little birds, in peace reposing, 

Under parent wings find rest : 
Whither shall Thy children flee, 
Heavenly Father, but to Thee ? 
Thou will watch, while, in Thy keeping, 
Calm and peaceful, we are sleeping. 



61 



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O Pure Reformers, Not in Vain 



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By every wind and tide ; The glory of your fight, 

The voice of nature and of God We'll ask at least, in earnest prayer, 

Speaks out upon your side. God's blessing on the Right. 

John G. Whittier 

62 Day is Dying in the West 

Evening Praise " William F. Sherwin, 1877 



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Holy, holy, holy Lord God of Hosts ! 
Heaven and earth are full of Thee ! 
Heaven and earth are praising Thee, 
O Lord most high ! 

Mary A. Lathbury, 1877 



63 



Help Us, Thou Gracious Father 



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O refresh us at Thy fountain 

As each morning dawns anew, 
Lead us in the paths of justice, 
Keep us ever kind and true, 
As we humbly 
Walk beside Thee, 
Learning how and what to do. 



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3 Seeking ever in Thy temple 

For the things of highest worth, 
Working for and with our fellows, 
In our souls may thoughts have birth, 
That will help us 
In the spreading 
Of Thy kingdom o'er the earth. 

Elizabeth Lloyd 



64 



O Still in Accents Sweet and Strong 



St. Marguerite 



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3 O Thou whose call our hearts has stirred, 
To do Thy will we come ; 
Thrust in our sickles at Thy word, 
And bear our harvest home. 

Samuel Longfellow, 1864 



We hear the call ; in dreams no more 

In selfish ease we lie ; 
But girded for our Father's work, 

Go forth beneath His sky. 



65 



God of the Strong, God of the Weak 



Mozart 



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In suffering Thou hast made us one, 
In mighty burdens one are we ; 

Teach us that lowliest duty done 
Is highest service unto Thee. . 

Teach us, great Teacher of mankind, 
The sacrifice that brings Thy balm ; 



The love, the work, that bless and bind , 
Teach us Thy majesty, Thy calm. 

Teach Thou, and we shall know indeed 
The truth divine that maketh free ; 

And knowing, we may sow the seed 
That blossoms through eternity. 

Richard Watson Gilder, 1903 



66 



They Who Tread the Path of Labor 



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2 Where the many toil together, 

There am I among my own ; 
Where the tired workman sleepeth, 
There am I with him alone. 

3 I, the peace that passeth knowledge, 

Dwell amid the daily strife, 
I, the bread of heaven, am broken 
In the sacrament of life. 



4 Every task, however simple, 

Sets the soul that does it free ; 
Every deed of love and mercy 
Done to man is done to me. 

5 Never more thou needest seek me, 

I am with thee everywhere ; 
Raise the stone and thou shalt find me ; 
Cleave the wood and I am there. 



From " Poems of Henry van Dyke.' 



Henry van Dyke, 1900 
Copyright, ion, by Charles Scribner's Sons. By permission of the publishers 



67 



God Send Us Men 



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2 God send us men alert and quick 

His lofty precepts to translate, 
Until the laws of Right become 
The laws and habits of the State. 

3 God send us men of steadfast will, 

Patient, courageous, strong and true; 



With vision clear and mind equipped, 
His will to learn, His work to do. 

4 God send us men with hearts ablaze, 
All truth to love, all wrong to hate ; 
These are the patriots nations need, 
These are the bulwarks of the State. 
F. J. Gilman, alt. 



68 



Where Cross the Crowded Ways of Life 



Germany 



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2 In haunts of wretchedness and need, 

On shadowed thresholds dark with fears, 
From paths where hide the lures of greed, 
We catch the vision of thy tears. 

3 The cup of water given for thee 

Still holds the freshness of thy grace ; 
Yet long these multitudes to see 
The sweet compassion of thy face. 



4 O Master, from the mountain side, 

Make haste to heal these hearts of pain, 
Among these restless throngs abide, 
O tread the city's streets again. 

5 Till sons of men shall learn thy love 

And follow where thy feet have trod : 
Till glorious from thy heaven above 
Shall come the city of our God. 

Frank Mason North, 1905 



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2 lead me, Lord, that I may lead 

The wandering and the wavering feet ; 
O feed me, Lord, that I may feed 
Thy hungry ones with manna sweet. 

3 O teach me, Lord, that I may teach 

The precious things thou dost impart ; 



70 



, | | ■ . ■■■■ | 

And wing my words, that they may reach 
The hidden depths of many a heart. 

4 O use me, Lord, use even me, 

Just as thou wilt, and when, and where ; 
Until thy blessed face I see, 
Thy rest, thy joy, thy glory share. 

Frances R. Havergal, 1872 



God of the Nations 



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And stronger far the clasped hands 
Of labor's teeming throngs, 

Who in a hundred tongues repeat 
Their common creeds and songs. 

From shore to shore the peoples call 
In loud and sweet acclaim, 



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71 



The gloom of land and sea is lit 
With Pentecostal flame. 

4 O Father! from the curse of war 
We pray Thee give release, 
And speed, O speed the blessed day 
Of justice, love and peace. 

John Haynes Holmes, 1911 

We Need Love's Tender Lessons Taught 

( Tune — " Lambeth," see music above ) 
We need love's tender lessons taught 2 Alone to guilelessness and love 

As only weakness can ; Heaven's gate shall open fall ; 

God hath His small interpreters, The mind of pride is nothingness, 

The child must teach the man. The childlike heart is all. 

John G. Whittier, 1855 



72 



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2 Once again the word comes true, 
Lo, He maketh all things new. 
Now the dark cold days are o'er, 
Light and gladness are before. 

3 How our hearts leap with the spring ! 
How our spirits soar and sing ! 



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Light is victor over gloom, 
Life triumphant o'er the tomb. 

4 Change, then, mourning into praise, 
And, for dirges, anthems raise ! 
All our fears and griefs shall be 
Lost in immortality. 

Samuel Longfellow 



73 



Materna 



Beautiful for Spacious Skies 



Samuel A. Ward, 1882 



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2 O beautiful for pilgrim feet, 

Whose stern, impassioned stress 
A thoroughfare for freedom beat 

Across the wilderness ; 
America ! America ! 

God mend thine every flaw, 
Confirm thy soul in self control, 

Thy liberty in law. 

3 O beautiful for heroes proved 

In liberating strife, 
Who more than self their country loved, 
And mercy more than life ; 



America ! America ! 

May God thy gold refine, 
Till all success be nobleness, 

And every gain divine. 

4 O beautiful for patriot dream 
That sees beyond the years, 
Thine alabaster cities gleam, 

Undimmed by human tears; 
America ! America ! 

God shed His grace on thee, 
And crown thy good with brotherhood, 
From sea to shining sea. 

Katherine Lee Bates, 1904 



74 



O God of Gifts Exceeding Rare 



Beatitudo 

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2 Oh, take away the unused gift, 
The power allowed to drift; 

Show us that small things from above 
Gain strength to heal through love. 

3 The truths, O Lord, thou late hast taught 

Have made us clearly see 
That when we serve thee as we ought, 
Then only are we free. 

4 Grant us that thy plan of majesty 
May let us work with thee 

Copyright, 1914, Survey Associates 



To change the water into wine, 
Make humblest things divine. 

5 Preserve us gentle in our strength, 

And patient with the slow, 
Till we deserve such praise at length 
As only thou shalt know. 

6 O God of gifts exceeding rare, 

Grant that we here below 
May live the answer to our prayer 
For talents that shall grow. 

Madeline Sweeny Miller, 1913 



75 



God is There 



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Nature's God is there, 
Nature's God is there. 



76 



All Things Bright arid Beautiful 




From " El. Heerwart's Coll.' 



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Each little bird that sings, 

He made their glowing colors, 

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3 The tall trees in the green wood, 

The meadows where we play, 



The rushes by the water, 
We gather every day. 

4 He gave us eyes to see them, 
And lips that we might tell, 
The goodness of the Father, 
Who hath done all things well. 

Cecil Frances Alexander 



77 



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We hear the brooklet flow. 



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The spring is come ! the spring is come ! 

The merry robins sing ; 
And in the grass, where'er we pass, 

The sweet, white daisies spring, 
And in the grass, where'er we pass, 

The sweet, white daisies spring. 



78 



Little Lambs 



H. J. Gauntlett 



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Heavenly Father may we be 
Thus obedient unto thee. 



79 



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The Air is Filled with the Echoes 

Margaret Bradford Morton 



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2 The world was dark and lonely, 

Till the sound of his voice was heard 
And the hearts of the sad and lowly 

Leaped at his lightest word ; 
And over the fields in their beauty 

The lilies and birds of the air, 
The tender love of the Father 

He showed us everywhere. 



An angel may praise him in heaven, 

A child may sing upon earth, 
With a joy that shall ring thro' all ages, 

The story of Christ and his birth. 
O listen, dear children, listen ! 

The bells and the great chimes say 
The sweetest song that ever was sung 

" Jesus was born to-day ! " 



81 



Calm on the Listening Ear of Night 



Bethlehem 



Gottfried W. Fink, 1842 



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The answering hills of Palestine 

Send back the glad reply, 
And greet from all their holy heights 

The Day-spring from on high : 
O'er the blue depths of Galilee 

There comes a holier calm ; 
And Sharon waves in solemn praise 

Her silent groves of palm. 

" Glory to God ! " the lofty strain 

The realm of ether fills ; 
How sweeps the song of solemn joy 

O'er Judah's sacred hills ! 



" Glory to God ! " the sounding skies 
Loud with their anthems ring : 

" Peace on the earth ; good-will to men, 
From heaven's eternal King." 

This day shall Christian tongues be mute, 

And Christian hearts be cold ? 
O catch the anthem that from heaven 

O'er Judah's mountains rolled ; 
When burst upon that listening night 

The high and solemn lay, 
" Glory to God ; on earth be peace : " 

Salvation comes to-day. 

Edmund H. Sears, 1834. (Text of 1875) 



82 



Our Father! Thy Dear Name Doth Show 

Tune— Bethlehem (See 81) 



1 Our Father ! Thy dear name doth show 

The greatness of Thy love ; 
All are Thy children here below 

As in Thy heaven above. 
One family on earth are we 

Throughout its widest span ; 
O help us every where to see 

The brotherhood of man. 



Bring in, we pray, the glorious day 

When battle cries are stilled ; 
When bitter strife is swept away 

And hearts with love are filled. 
O help us banish pride and wrong, 

Which since the world began 
Have marred its peace ; help us make strong 

The brotherhood of man. . 



Alike we share Thy tender care ; 

We trust one heavenly Friend ; 
Before one mercy -seat in prayer 

In confidence we bend ; 
Alike we hear Thy loving call ; 

One heavenly vision scan, 
One Lord, one faith, one hope for all 

The brotherhood of man. 



83 



St. Catherine 



4 Close knit the warm fraternal tie 
That makes the whole world one ; 
Our discords change to harmony 

Like angel -songs begun : 
At last, upon that brighter shore 

Complete Thy glorious plan, 
And heaven shall crown for evermore 
The brotherhood of man. 

Charles H. Richards, 1910 

Faith of Our Fathers! 

Henri F. Hemy, 1863 : 
alt. by James G. Walton, 1871 



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Our fathers, chained in prisons dark, 
Were still in heart and conscience free ; 

And blest would be their children's fate 
If they, like them, should die for thee : 

Faith of our fathers, holy faith ! 

We will be true to thee till death. 



Faith of our fathers ! God's great power 
Shall win all nations unto thee ; 

And through the truth that comes from God 
Mankind shall then indeed be free : 

Faith of our fathers, holy faith ! 

We will be true to thee till death. 



Faith of our fathers! We will love 

Both friend and foe in all our strife, 
And preach thee, too, as love knows how 

By kindly words and virtuous life: 
Faith of our fathers, holy faith ! 
We will be true to thee till death. 

Rev. Frederick W. Faber, 1849 : verse 2, line 4 ; verse 3, lines 1-4 alt. 



84 



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Praise the Lord: Ye Heavens Adore Him 

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2 Praise the Lord, for He is glorious ; 

Never shall His promise fail : 
God hath made His saints victorious ; 

Sin and death shall not prevail. 
Praise the God of our salvation ; 

Hosts on high, His power proclaim; 
Heaven and earth and all creation, 

Laud and magnify His Name. 



3 Worship, honor, glory, blessing, 
Lord, we offer unto Thee ; 
Young and old, Thy praise expressing, 

In glad homage bend the knee. 
All the saints in heaven adore Thee ; 
We would bow before Thy throne : 
As Thine angels serve before Thee, 
So on earth Thy will be done. 
Verses 1, 2, Anon. c. 1801 ; verse 3, Edward Osier, 1836 



85 



God Is Love; His Mercy Brightens 



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God is Wisdom, God is Love. 



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Hope and comfort from above ; 
Everywhere His glory shineth : 
God is Wisdom, God is Love. 

Sir John Bowring, 1825 



86 



I Dimly Guess from Blessings Known 



Amesbury 




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Copyright, I895, by The Trustees of The Presbyterian Board of Publication and Sabbath-School Work Used by per. 



No offering of my own I have, 

Nor works my faith to prove ; 
I can but give the gifts He gave, 

And plead His love for love. 
And so beside the Silent Sea 

I wait the muffled oar ; 
No harm from Him can come to me 

On ocean or on shore. 



I know not where His islands lift 

Their f ronded palms in air ; 
I only know I cannot drift 

Beyond His love and care. 
And Thou, O Lord ! by whom are seen 

Thy creatures as they be, 
Forgive me if too close I lean 

My human heart on Thee ! 

John G. Whittier, 1867 



87 



I Have Seen the Glory 



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1. O I have seen theglo-ry of the Lord; His message and His 

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2 He did reveal to me His holy plan, [men, 
" Keep pure thy heart, and serve thy fellow- 
Forgetting not the vision thou hast seen ; 
And imitate the lowly Nazarene ; 
Attune thy mind to love, love is the key 
That opens heaven, and leads thy soul to Me, 
. That leads thy soul to Me." 



3 O Lord! I come, for Thou hast giv'n me grace 
To hear Thy voice and see Thee face to face. 
I will henceforth pursue Thy holy plan, 
Keep pure my heart, and serve my fellow- 
ril follow love, unselfish love — that key [ men, 
That opens heaven, and leads my soul to 
That leads my soul to Thee. [Thee, 

Edgar M. Zavitz, 1923 



88 



Hushed was the Evening Hymn 



Samuel 



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The old man, meek and mild, 
The priest of Israel, slept ; 

His watch the temple-child, 
The little Levite, kept ; 

And what from Eli's sense was sealed, 

The Lord to Hannah's son revealed. 

O give me Samuel's ear, 

The open ear, O Lord, 
Alive and quick to hear 

Each whisper of Thy word ! 
Like him to answer at Thy call, 
And to obey Thee first of all. 



I I 

4 give me Samuel's heart, 

A lowly heart, that waits 
Where in Thy house Thou art, 

Or watches at Thy gates ! 
By day and night, a heart that still 
Moves at the breathing of Thy will. 

5 O give me Samuel's mind, 

A sweet, unmurmuring faith, 
Obedient and resigned 

To Thee in life and death ! 
That I may read with childlike eyes 
Truths that are hidden from the wise. 
James D. Burns, 1857 



89 



All that's Good and Great and True 



Orientis Partibus 



From mediaeval French Melody 
Arr. by Richard Redhead, 1853 



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Not a bird that doth not sing, 
Sweetest praises to Thy name; 

Not an insect on the wing 

But Thy wonders doth proclaim. 



3 Every blade and every tree, 
All in happy concert ring, 
And in wondrous harmony 
Join in praises to their King. 



4 Far and near, o'er land and sea, 

Mountain-top and wooded dell, 
All, in singing, sing of Thee, 
Songs of love ineffable. 

5 Fill us then with love divine, 

Grant that we, though toiling here, 
May in spirit, being Thine, 
See and hear Thee everywhere. 

Godfrey Thring 



90 



When the Mists Have Rolled in Splendor 



Rousseau's Hymn 



J. J. Rousseau, 1775 



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If we err in human blindness, 

And forget that we are dust ; 
If we miss the law of kindness, 

When we struggle to be just ; 
Snowy wings of peace shall cover 

All the anguish of to-day ; 
When the weary watch is over, 

And the mists have rolled away. 



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When the mists have risen above us, 

As our Father knows His own, 
Face to face with those who love us, 

We shall know as we are known, - 
Low beyond the orient meadows, 

Floats the golden fringe of day ; 
Heart to heart we'll bide the shadows, 

Till the mists have rolled away. 

Annie Herbert 



91 



Still, Still with Thee 



Windsor. (Ventnor) 

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Joseph Barnby, 1838-1896 




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2 Alone with Thee amid the mystic shadows, 

The solemn hush of Nature newly born; 
Alone with Thee in breathless adoration, 
In the calm dew and freshness of the morn. 

3 When sinks the soul, subdued by toil, to slumber, 

Its closing eye looks up to Thee in prayer; 
Sweet the repose beneath the wings o'ershading, 
But sweeter still to wake and find Thee there. 

4 So shall it be at last in that bright morning 

When the soul waketh and life's shadows flee; 
O in that hour, fairer than daylight dawning, 
Shall rise the glorious thought, I am with Thee ! 

Harriet Beecher Stowe, 1855, ab. 



For the Beauty of the Earth 



Arranged from Conrad Kocher, 1838 




Lord of all, to Thee we 



raise This our hymn of grate- f ul praise. A - men. 



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2 For the beauty of each hour 

Of the day and of the night, 
Hill and vale, and tree and flower, 
Sun and moon, and stars of light. — Ref. 

3 For the joy of human love, 

Brother, sister, parent, child, 



1— 

Friends on earth, and friends above, 
For all gentle thoughts and mild.— Ref. 

For each perfect gift of Thine 
To our race so freely given, 

Graces human and divine 
Flowers of earth, and buds of heaven,-REF. 
F. S. Pierpoint, 1864, alt. 



93 Father in Heaven, Who Lovest All 

Pater Omnium Henry J. E. Holmes, 1875 



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2 Teach us to bear the yoke in youth, 
With steadfastness and careful truth ; 
That, in our time, Thy grace may give 
The truth whereby the nations live. — Ref. 

3 Teach us to rule ourselves alway, 
Controlled and cleanly night and day ; 
That we may bring, if need arise, 

No maimed or worthless sacrifice. — Ref. 

4 Teach us to look in all our ends 

On Thee for Judge, and not our friends ; 



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That we, with Thee, may walk uncowed 
By fear or favor of the crowd. — Ref. 
Teach us the strength that cannot seek, 
By deed or thought, to hurt the weak ; 
That, under Thee, we may possess 
Man's strength to comfort man's distress. 
Teach us delight in simple things, 
And mirth that has no bitter springs ; 
Forgiveness free of evil done, 
And love to all men 'neath the sun. — Ref. 
Rudyard Kipling, 1906 




Father, to Us Thy Children, Humbly Kneeling 



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2 That we may conquer base desire and passion, 

That we may rise from selfish thought and will, 
O'ercome the world's allurement, threat, and fashion, 
Walk humbly, gently, leaning on Thee still. 

3 Let all Thy goodness by our minds be seen, 

Let all Thy mercy on our souls be sealed; 
Lord, if Thou wilt, Thy power can make us clean ; 
O, speak the word, Thy servants shall be healed! 

James Freeman Clarke, 1841 



95 The Still Small Voice that Speaks Within 

Gabriel Traditional 

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4 I thank Thee, Father, for this friend 
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In every time of need.— Ref. 

Fanny Fagan 



96 



To Knights in the Days' of Old 



Follow the Gleam 



Sallie Hume Douglas 




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2 And we who would serve the King, Saying, " Follow, follow the gleam, 

And loyally Him obey, Standards of worth over the earth 

In the consecrate silence know Follow, follow, follow the gleam 

That the challenge still sounds to-day, Of the light that shall bring the dawn." 

The Silver Bay Prize Song, 1920. Written by Bryn Mawr College 
By permission of The Woman's Press 



97 



Lead Us, O Father 



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2 Lead us, O Father, in the paths of right ; 
Blindly we stumble when we walk alone, 
Involved in shadows of a darksome night ; 
Only with Thee we journey safely on. 



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Lead us, O Father, to Thy heavenly rest, 
However rough and steep the path may be, 

Through joy or sorrow,as Thou deemest best, 
Until our lives are perfected in Thee. 
William H. Burleigh, 1871 



98 



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What Thou Wilt, Father, Give 

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In the shadow of Thy grace ; 
Let me find in Thine employ 
Peace that dearer is than joy. 

3 If there be some weaker one, 
Give me strength to help him on : 
If a blinder soul there be, 

Let me guide him nearer Thee. 



4 Make my mortal dreams come true 
With the work I fain would do ; 
Clothe with life the weak intent • 
Let me be the thing I meant ! 

5 Out of self to love be led, 
And to heaven acclimated, 
Until all things sweet and good 
Seem my natural habitude. 

John G. Whittier, 1864 



99 



Blest be the Tie that Binds 



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And hope to meet again. 

5 This glorious hope revives 
Our courage by the way, 
While each in expectation lives, 
And longs to see the day. 

Rev. John Fawcett, pub., 1782 



2 Before our Father's throne 

We pour our ardent prayers ; 
Our fears, our hopes, our aims are one, 
Our comforts and our cares. 

3 When we asunder part, 

It gives us inward pain ; 



100 

Festal Song 



Rise Up, Men of God 



William H. Walter, 1904 




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3 Lift high the cross of Christ ! 

Tread where His feet have trod 
As brothers of the Son of man, 
Rise up, O men of God ! 

William Pierson Merrill, 1911 



101 Behold Us, Lord, a Little Space 

St. Leonard Robert Jackson, < 1840 ) 

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Of business, toil, and care ; 
And scarcely can we turn aside 
For one brief hour of prayer. 

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Wherein Thou mayest be sought ; 
On homeliest work Thy blessing falls, 
In truth and patience wrought. 



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4 Thine are the loom, the forge, the mart, 

The wealth of land and sea, 

The worlds of science and of art 

Revealed and ruled by Thee. 

5 Work shall be prayer, if all be wrought 

• As Thou wouldst have it done, 
And prayer, by Thee inspired and taught, 
Itself with work be one. 

Rev. John Ellerton, 1870 



102 



Brothers of Every Clime 



Hymn for Universal Peace 
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Evelyn Leeds-Cole 




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God grant us each the light 
To know and do the right 

Though loss obtain ; 
Seeing a brother's need, 
Yield not to selfish greed, 
When love is man's first creed, 

Then Peace will reign. 



Father in heaven, we pray 
Speed Thou the righteous day 

When war shall cease ; 
When nations hand in hand, 
O'er every sea and land, 
In love before Thee stand, 

O grant Thy peace . 



4 Joyful our praises ring, 
Hosannas to our King, 

O'er earth's wide span; 
Angels make glad reply — 
Hark! their exultant cry, 
"Glory to God on high, 
Good will to man!" 

Evelyn Leeds-Cole 

Copies of the "School Edition " of this Hymn may be had for $1.00 per doz. or 
ordering from H. L. Cole, 307 N. Elm Ave., Jackson, Mich. 



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103 

Hesperus 



God of Love 



Henry Baker, 1866 



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2 Remember, Lord, Thy works of old, 
The wonders that our fathers told ; 
Remember not our sin's dark stain, 
Give peace, O God, give peace again ! 



3 Whom shall we trust but Thee, O Lord ? 
Where rest but on Thy faithful word ? 
None ever called on Thee in vain, 
Give peace, O God, give peace again ! 

Henry W. Baker, 1861 




If Any Little Word of Mine 

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If any lift of mine may ease 

The burden of another, 
God give me love, and care, and strength, 

To help my toiling brother. 



105 



Lord, We Come Before Thee Now 



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Now we seek Thee, here we stay ; 






Lord, we know not how to go, 
Till a blessing Thou bestow. 

4 Grant that all may seek and find 
Thee, a gracious God and kind : 
Heal the sick, the captive free ; 
Let as all rejoice in Thee. 

William Hammond, 1745 



106 



The Blessed Day is Dawning 



The Dawn of Peace 
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The past is gone for aye ; 
New lessons man is learning 
Of love and peace to-day. — Ref. 



3 The blessed light is dawning, 
O, may it e'er increase ! 
And bring that day's glad coming, 

When war and strife shall cease. — Ref. 
Ellwood Roberts 



107 

Nettleton 



Peace Be to This Congregation 




Asahel Nettleton, 1825 
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2 O Thou God of peace, be near us, 
Fix within our hearts Thy home ; 
With Thy bright appearing cheer us, 
In Thy blessed freedom come ! 



I 

Come with all Thy revelations, 
Truth, which we so long have sought ; 

Come with Thy deep consolations, 
Peace of God, which passeth thought ! 
Charles Wesley 



108 

Song of the Twentieth Century 



Christ in the Heart 



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2 Angels of Bethlehem, sound your glad 3 
chorus, 
Thrilling our souls by its message divine ; 
Warfare and carnage no more shall rule o'er us, 
Brightly the star of our Saviour shall shine. 
Star of the Prince of peace, 
Bring to us swift release, 
Let not our brothers their brothers destroy : 
Lead us to truly pray, 
Show us the higher way, 
Teach us that living for others is joy. 



Flag of our fathers, float on in thy glory ! 
Always thy red stand for justice and 
law, 
Ever thy white tell the sweet gospel story, 
Never thy blue in its truth show a flaw, 
And every lustrous star, 
Shine from thy folds afar, 
Over a people united and free ; 
Guarding this flag above, 
Keep us, O God of love, 
Loyal to country, to manhood and Thee, 

Elizabeth Lloyd 



109 

Lux Eoi 



Once to Every Man and Nation 



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2 Then to side with truth is noble, when we share her wretched crust, 
Ere her cause bring fame and profit, and 'tis prosperous to be just; 
Then it is the brave man chooses, while the coward stands aside, 
Doubting in his abject spirit, till his Lord is crucified, 

And the multitude make virtue of the faith they had denied. 

3 New occasions teach new duties: time makes ancient good uncouth; 
They must upward still and onward, who would keep abreast with truth; 
Lo, before us gleam her camp-fires! we ourselves must pilgrims be, 
Launch our Mayflower, and steer boldly through the desperate winter sea, 
Nor attempt the Future's portal with the Past's blood-rusted key. 

James R. Lowell, 1845 



110 

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2 Another year of mercies, 

Of faithfulness and grace ; 
Another year of gladness 

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Another year of leaning 

Upon Thy loving breast ; 
Another year of trusting, 

Of quiet, happy rest, — 



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3 Another year of service, 
Of witness for Thy love ; 
Another year of training 
For holier work above. 
Another year is dawning, 

Dear Father, let it be, 

On earth, or else in heaven, 

Another year for Thee. 

Frances R. Havergal, 1874 




Ring Out, Wild Bells, to the Wild Sky 

Joseph Barnby, 1872 



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Ring out the grief that saps the mind, 

For those that here we see no more ; 

Ring out the feud of rich and poor, 
Ring in redress to all mankind. 
Ring out false pride in place and blood, 

The civic slander and the spite ; 

Ring in the love of truth and right, 
Ring in the common love of good. 



Ring out old shapes of foul disease, 

Ring out the narrowing lust of gold ; 

Ring out the thousand wars of old, 
Ring in the thousand years of peace. 
Ring in the valiant man and free, 

The larger heart, the kindlier hand ; 

Ring out the darkness of the land, 
Ring in the Christ that is to be. 

Alfred Tennyson, 1850 

Father, Now our Prayer is Said 

Arr. from G. F. Handel, 1728 

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Pleas - ures pass from day to day 

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2 While we sleep it will be near ; 
We shall wake and find it here ; 
We shall feel it in the air, 
When we say our morning prayer. 

3 And when things are sad or wrong, 
Then we know that love is strong; 



When we ache, or when we weep, 
Then we know that love is deep. 

Love is old, and love is new ; 
Love outlasteth firm and true : 
And the Lord who made it thus, 
Did it in His love for us. 

W. B. Rands, 1826-1882 



113 



Hark! The Lilies 



The Lilies 

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Be our lot below, 
Think upon the lilies 
See how fair they grow. 



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Flowers of field and garden — 

All their voices blend; 
And their Maker's praises 

To our souls commend. 



114 



Be Silent, Be Silent 



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2 Be silent, be silent, 

For holy this place, 
This altar that echoes 
The message of grace. — Cho. 

3 Be silent, be silent, 

Breathe humby our prayer, 



A foretaste of Eden, 
This moment we share.- 



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4 Be silent, be silent, 
His mercy record, 
Be silent, be silent, 
And wait on the Lord. — Cho. 
Fanny J. Crosby 



115 



One By One the Sands are Flowing 

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4 Do not linger with regretting, 

Or for passing hours despond ; 
Nor, the daily toil forgetting, 
Look too eagerly beyond. 

5 Every hour that fleets so slowly 

Has its task to do or bear ; 
Luminous the crown, and holy, 
When each gem is set with care. 
Adelaide Anne Proctor (1825-1864) 



2 One by one thy duties wait thee, 

Let thy whole strength go to each ; 
Let no future dreams elate thee, 
Learn thou first what these can teach. 

3 One by one thy griefs shall meet thee, 

Do not fear an armed band ; 
One will fade as others greet thee, 
Shadows passing through the land. 



116 



He Hides Within the Lily 



St. Anselm 



Joseph Barnby, 1869 




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We linger at the vigil 

With Him who bent the knee 
To watch the old-time lilies 

In distant Galilee ; 
And still the worship deepens 

And quickens into new, 
As, brightening down the ages, 

God's secret thrilleth through. 

3 O Toiler of the lily, 

Thy touch is in the Man ! 

No leaf that dawns to petal 

But hints the angel-plan : 



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The flower-horizons open, 
The blossom vaster shows ; 

We hear thy wide worlds echo, 
"See how the lily grows ! " 

Shy yearnings of the savage, 

Unfolding, thought by thought, 
To holy lives are lifted, 

To visions fair are wrought : 
The races rise and cluster, 

And evils fade and fall, 
Till chaos blooms to beauty, 

Thy purpose crowning all ! 

William C. Gannett, 1873 




Joy to the World 

Arranged from Handel's Messiah, 1742, by Lowell Mason, 1830 



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2 Joy to the world ! the Saviour reigns ; 
Let men their songs employ ; 
While fields and floods, rocks.hills and plains, 
Repeat the sounding joy. 



3 He rules the world with truth and grace, 
And makes the nations prove 
The glories of His righteousness, 
And wonders of His love. 

Isaac Watts, 1719 



118 While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks by Night 



Christmas 




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"Fear not !" said he for mighty dread 

Had seized their troubled mind, 
"Glad tidings of great joy I bring, 

To you and all mankind. 
"To you, in David's town, this day 

Is born, of David's line, 
The Saviour, who is Christ the Lord ; 

And this shall be the sign : 
" The heavenly babe you there shall find 

To human view displayed, 



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All meanly wrapped in swathing-bands, 

And in a manger laid." 
Thus spake the seraph ; and forthwith 

Appeared a shining throng 
Of angels praising God, who thus 

Addressed their joyful song : 
"All glory be to God on high, 

And to the earth be peace : 
Good-will henceforth from heaven to men, 

Begin and never cease ! " 

Nahum Tate, 1702 



119 



Once a Little Baby Lay 



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2 By the shining vision taught 

Shepherds for the Christ-Child sought, 

Long ago on Christmas ; 
Guided in a star-lit way, 
Wise men came their gifts to pay, 

Long ago on Christmas, 

Long ago on Christmas. 



And to-day the whole glad earth, 
Praises God for that Child's birth, 

Long ago on Christmas ; 
For the Light, the Truth, the Way, 
Came to bless the earth that day, 

Long ago on Christmas, 

Long ago on Christmas, 

Emilie Poulsson 



120 



Carry the Sunshine 



Sop. and Alto 



F. A. Clark 






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Car-ry the sunshine, heavenly sunshine, Scat-ter it 'round you from day unto day; 

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2 Carry the sunshine, heavenly sunshine, 

Unto the weary wherever they be, 
Comfort and help them, tenderly tell them 
Jesus is near, heaven's sunshine is free. — Ref. 

3 Carry the sunshine, heavenly sunshine, 

Life's dreary shadows quickly will flee, 
Radiantly dawning, fair as the morning, 
God's smile will linger forever with thee. — Ref. 

F. A. Clark 






121 



Thank Thee 



Hollis Dann 



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Breaks the Joyful Easter Dawn 



Easter Hymn 



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2 Rousing them from dreary hours 

Under snow-drifts chilly, 
In His hand He brings the flowers, 

Brings the rose and lily. 
Every little buried bud 

Into life He raises ; 
Every wild flower of the wood 

Chants the dear Lord's praises. — Cho. 



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3 Open, happy buds of spring, 
For the sun has risen ! 
Through the sky sweet voices ring, 

Calling you from prison. 
Little children dear, look up ! 

Towards his brightness pressing, 
Lift up every heart, a cup 

For the dear Lord's blessing. — Cho. 
Lucy Larcom 



123 

St. Bees 



Lord, as We Thy Name Profess 



John B. Dykes, 1862 



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2 Make us resolute to do 

What Thou showest to be true; 
Make us hate and shun the ill, 
Loyal to Thy holy will. 



May Thy yoke be meekly worn, 
May Thy cross be bravely borne; 
Make us patient, gentle, kind, 
Pure in life and heart and mind. 
Edwin P. Parker, 1 



124 



Strong Son of God, Immortal Love 



St. Crispin 



George J. Elvey, 1862 




1. Strong Son of God, im - mor - tal Love, Whom we, that have not seen Thy face, 

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Believing where we can-not prove ; A-men. 




2 Thou seemest human and divine, 
The highest, holiest manhood, Thou; 
Our wills are ours, we know not how; 
Our wills are ours, to make them Thine. 

3 Our little systems have their day; 
They have their day and cease to be ; 



They are but broken lights of Thee, 
And Thou, O Lord, art more than they. 

Let knowledge grow from more to more, 
But more of reverence in us dwell ; 
That mind and soul, according well. 
May make one music as before. 

Alfred Tennyson, 1850 



125 Spirit of God, Descend Upon My Heart 

Morecambe Frederick C. Atkinson, 1870 

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2 I ask no dream, no prophet-ecstasies, 

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No angel-visitant, no opening skies; 
But take the dimness of my soul away. 

3 Teach me to feel that Thou art always nigh; 

Teach me the struggles of the soul to bear, 
To check the rising doubt, the rebel sigh; 
Teach me the patience of unanswered prayer. 

4 Teach me to love Thee as Thine angels love, 

One holy passion filling all my frame, — 
The baptism of the heaven -descended Dove, 
My heart an altar, and Thy love the flame. 

George Croly, 1854 

God, That Madest Earth and Heaven 

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When the constant sun returning 

Unseals our eyes, 
May we, born anew like morning, 

To labor rise; 
Gird us for the task that calls us, 
Let not ease and self enthrall us, 
Strong through Thee whate'er befall us, 

O God most wise! 

Reginal Heber, 1827 ( 1st stanza ) 
Frederick L. Hosmer, 1912 



127 



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2 Enough that blessings undeserved 

Have marked my erring track ; 
That wheresoe'er my feet have swerved, 
His chastening turned me back ; 

3 That more and more a providence 

Of love is understood, 



Making the springs of time and sense 
Sweet with eternal good ; 

And so the shadows fall apart, 
And so the west winds play ; 

And all the windows of my heart 
I open to the day. 

John Greenleaf Whittier, 1856 



128 



In Heavenly Love Abiding 



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Wherever He may guide me, 

No want shall turn me back; 
My Shepherd is beside me, 

And nothing can I lack. 
His wisdom ever waketh, 

His sight is never dim. 
He knows the way He taketh, 

And I will walk with Him. 



Green pastures are before me, 

Which yet I have not seen ; 
Bright skies will soon be o'er me, 

Where darkest clouds have been. 
My hope I cannot measure, 

My path to life is free, 
My Saviour has my treasure, 

And He will walk with me. 

Anna L. Waring, 1850 



129 



Light of the World, We Hail Thee 




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Light of the world, Thy beauty 

Steals into every heart, 
And glorifies with duty 

Life's poorest, humblest part; 
Thou robest in Thy splendor 

The simplest ways of men, 
And helpest them to render 

Light back to Thee again. 



Light of the world, illumine 

This darkened earth of Thine, 
Till everything that's human 

Be filled with what's divine ; 
Till every tongue and nation, 

From sin's dominion free, 
Rise in the new creation 

Which springs from love and Thee. 
John S. B. Monsell, 1863 



130 

Crusader's Hymn 



Fairest Lord Jesus 




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2 Fair are the meadows, 
Fairer still the woodlands, 

Robed in the blooming garb of spring ; 
Jesus is fairer, 
Jesus is purer, 

Who makes the woeful heart to sing. 



3 Fair is the sunshine, 
Fairer still the moonlight, 
And all the twinkling, starry host ; 
Jesus shines brighter, 
Jesus shines purer 
Than all the angels heaven can boast. 
17th Century German Hymn. Translated c. 1850 




'Mid All the Traffic of the Ways 



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2 A little shrine of quietness, 

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3 A little shelter from life's stress, 

Where I may lay me prone, 



And bare my soul in loneliness, 
And know as I am known : 

A little place of mystic grace, 
Of self and sin swept bare, 

Where I may look upon Thy face, 
And talk with Thee in prayer. 

John Oxenham, 1917 



132 



Father In Heaven 



Largo from the Opera " Xerxes 
Very slowly. 



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Come, Master Workman, Work with Us 



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2 Leave bells of praise for bells of toil, 

And altar bowls for pots of clay, 
And censers sweet where spikenard burns, 
For furnace, glowing as the day. 

3 Aloft, 'mid pinnacles of steel , 

We dare to stand and build with Thee ; 
And when in timbered darkness deep, 
We dig and delve, our Comrade be. 



4 At home, at school, in church, in court, 

On thronging street, in cell alone, 
On mountain top, or ocean wild, 

Dear Master, make our tasks Thine own. 

5 " My Father worketh and I work," 

Oh Christ, whom men and angels laud, 
Come share with us the toil and sweat, 
Thou Son of toil, Thou Son of God. 

Joseph Beaumont Hingley 



134 

Rachel 



O Son of Man, Thou Madest Known 



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2 O Workman true, may we fulfill 
In daily life Thy Father's will ; 
In duty's call, Thy call we hear 

To fuller life, through work sincere. 

3 Thou Master Workman, grant us grace 
The challenge of our tasks to face; 



By loyal scorn of second best, 
By effort true, to meet each test. 

And thus we pray in deed and word, 
Thy kingdom come on earth, O Lord ; 
In work that gives effect to prayer 
Thy purpose for Thy world we share. 
Milton S. Littlefield, 1916 



135 

Hosmer 



From Age to Age They Gather 

Frederick F. Bullard, 1902 






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Made holy by the might of love triumphant over death; 
"He finds his life who loseth it," forevermore it saith: 

The right is marching on! 

3 The earth is circling onward out of shadow into light ; 

The stars keep watch above our way, however dark the night; 
For ev'ry martyr's stripe there glows a bar of morning bright; 
And love is marching on! 

4 Lead on, O cross of martyr faith, with thee is victory; 

Shine forth, O stars and redd'ning dawn, the full day yet shall be, 
On earth His kingdom cometh, and with joy our eyes shall see, 
Our God is marching on! 

Frederick L. Hosmer, 1891 
Music copyright by The Pilgrim Press. Used by permission 



136 

Rosmore 



Hail the Hero Workers 



Henry G. Trembath, 1893 






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2 Hail ye, hero workers, 

Who to-day do hear 
Duty's myriad voices, 

Sounding high and clear; 
Ye who quick responding, 

Haste ye to your task, 
Be it grand or simple, 

Ye forgot to ask; 
Hail ye, noble workers, 

Builders of to-day, 
Who life's treasure gather, 

That shall last alway. 

Words copyright by Anna Garlin Spencer 



Hail ye, hero workers, 

Ye who yet shall come, 
When to this world's calling 

All our lips are dumb. 
Ye shall build more nobly, 

If our work be true, 
As we pass life's treasure 

On from old to new. 
Hail ye, then, all workers, 

Of all lands and time, 
One brave band of heroes, 

With one task sublime. 

Anna Garlin Spencer, 1851 



(Alternate tune— St. Gertrude, No. 21) 



God of Our Youth, to Whom We Yield 




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Eager to play the hero's part, 
Grant to us each that greater wealth, 

An undefiled and loyal heart, 
God of our youth, be Thou our might, 
To do the right, to do the right. 



When from the field of mimic strife, 

Of strength with strength, and speed with speed, 

We face the sterner fights of life, 

As then our strength in time of need, 

God of our youth, inspire us still, 

To do Thy will, to do Thy will. 

William Byron Forbush, 1911, altered 




I Would Be True 



Joseph Yates Peek, 1911 



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I would look up, and laugh, and love and lift, 
I would look up, and laugh, and love and lift. 

Howard Arnold Walter, 1917 




We Bear the Strain of Earthly Care 



Patty Stair, 1915 






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Through din of market, whirl of wheels, 

And thrust of driving trade, 
We follow where the Master leads, 

Serene and unafraid. 

The common hopes that make us men 
Were His in Galilee ; 



The tasks He gives are those He gave 
Beside the restless sea. 

4 Our brotherhood still rests in Him, 
The Brother of us all, 
And o'er the centuries still we hear 
The Master's winsome call. 

Ozora Stearns Davis, 1909 



140 



Brother Man, Fold to Thy Heart 



Strength and Stay 



Jonn B. Dykes, 1875 




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So shall the wide earth seem our Father's temple, 
Each loving life a psalm of gratitude. 

3 Then shall all shackles fall; the stormy clangor 

Of wild war music o'er the earth shall cease ; 
Love shall tread out the baleful fire of anger, 
And in its ashes plant the tree of peace. 

John G. Whittier, 1848 




Make Large Our Hearts 



Henry S. Cutler, 1872 



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Widen the reach our love can make 

Until it knows no bound, 
Until the peoples of the earth 

All in our love are found. 
That spirit that was His be ours 

Who walked in love's true way, 
Share we His task, His kingdom bring— 

The glorious new day. 



Caroline Goforth 



142 

Meirionydd 



The Voice of God Is Calling 



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2 I hear my people crying 

In cot and mine and slum ; 
No field or mart is silent, 

No city street is dumb. 
I see my people falling 

In darkness and despair. 
Whom shall I send to shatter 

The fetters which they bear? 

3 We heed, O Lord, Thy summons, 

And answer : here are we ! 
Send us upon Thine errand, 
Let us Thy servants be. 



Our strength is dust and ashes, 
Our years a passing hour ; 

But Thou canst use our weakness 
To magnify Thy power. 

From ease and plenty save us, 

From pride of place absolve, 
Purge us of low desire, 

Lift us to high resolve. 
Take us, and make us holy, 

Teach us Thy will and way ; 
Speak, and, behold ! we answer, 

Command, and we obey ! 

John Haynes Holmes, 1913 



143 

St. Peter 



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In Christ There is No East or West 

Alexander R. Reinagle, 1836 



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2 In Him shall true hearts everywhere 

Their high communion find ; 
His service is the golden cord 
Close-binding all mankind. 

3 Join hands then, brothers of the faith, 

Whate'er your race may be ; 



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Is surely kin to me. 

In Christ now meet both East and West, 
In Him meet South and North ; 

All Christly souls are one in Him 
Throughout the whole wide earth. 
John Oxenham, 1908 



These Things Shall Be— a Loftier Race 



German Melody, arranged by Samuel Dyer, 1828 




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2 They shall be gentle, brave and strong 

To spill no drop of blood, but dare 

All that may plant man's lordship firm 

On earth, and fire, and sea, and air. 

3 Nation with nation, land with land, 

Unarmed shall live as comrades free ; 



In every heart and brain shall throb 
The pulse of one fraternity. 

New arts shall bloom of loftier mold, 
And mightier music thrill the skies, 

And every life shall be a song, 
When all the earth is paradise. 

John Addington Symonds, 1880 



145 



It Swells Upon the Noon-Day Breeze 



Forest Green 



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Arranged by R. Vaughan Williams, 1906 






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good-will reign through all the world," The sons of earth re 



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The carrier sings it on his way, 

The trader from his mart, 
The children as they haste along, 

This anthem of the heart ; 
And mothers lull their babes to sleep, 

While fathers catch the strain, 
They all with blending voices cry, 

" On earth let good-will reign." 



Then listen to the gracious song, 

That strives with war's harsh cry, 
And join your voices to the choir 

That lifts it to the sky. 
For with their blending voices sweet, 

Men's hearts as one shall thrill, 
And human hands shall join in joy, 

To work the Lord's good-will. 

John C. Adams, 1849 



Strife at Last is Ended 



Rodman Wanamaker 




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Keep us all from ill — 
"Peace on earth forever 
And to men good-will." 

Copyright, 1926, by Rodman Wanamaker 



147 

Hope 



We Thank Thee, Lord, for This Fair Earth 

Herbert S. Irons, 1834-1905 



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For all their beauty, all their worth, Their light and glo-ry,come from Thee. A-men. 

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2 Thine are the flowers that clothe the ground, 

The trees that wave their arms above, 
The hills that gird our dwellings round, 
As Thou doest gird Thine own with love. 

3 Yet teach us still how far more fair, 

More glorious, Father, in Thy sight, 



Is one pure deed, one holy prayer, 
One heart that owns Thy Spirit's might. 

So while we gaze with thoughtful eye 
On all the gifts Thy love has given, 

Help us in Thee to live and die, 
By Thee to rise from earth to heaven. 
George E. L. Cotton, 1856 



148 

Sunshine 



The Beautiful Bright Sunshine 



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The beautiful affections 

That gather round our way, 
The joys that rise from household ties, 

And deepen day by day ; 
The tender love that guards us 

Whenever danger low'rs, 
O God ! how fair Thy loving care 

Has made this earth of ours. 



But brighter is the shining, 

And tend'rer is the love, 
And purer still the joys which fill 

The unseen home above, — 
The home where all His children 

Shall sing with fuller pow'rs, 
"O God ! how fair Thy loving care 

Has made this heav'n of ours." 

Anon. 



149 My God, I Thank Thee Who Hast Made 

Wentworth Frederick C. Maker, 1876 




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Joy to abound; 
So many gentle thoughts and deeds 

Circling us round; 
That in the darkest spot of earth 

Some love is found. 



The best in store ; 
We have enough, yet not too much 

To long for more; 
A yearning for a deeper peace, 

Not known before. 

Adelaide Anne Procter, 1858, alt. 



150 



All Beautiful the March of Days 



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O'er white expanses sparkling pure 

The radiant morns unfold ; 
The solemn splendors of the night 

Burn brighter through the cold ; 
Life mounts in every throbbing vein, 

Love deepens round the hearth, 
And clearer sounds the angel hymn, 

" Good-will to men on earth ! " 



O Thou from whose unfathomed law 

The year in beauty flows, 
Thyself the vision passing by 

In crystal and in rose, 
Day unto day doth utter speech, 

And night to night proclaim, 
In ever changing words of light, 

The wonder of Thy name ! 

Frances W. Wile, 1912 



151 



Eternal Source of Every Joy 



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2 Wide as the wheels of nature roll, 

Thy hand supports and guides the whole 
The sun is taught by Thee to rise, 
And darkness when to veil the skies. 

3 The flowery spring, at Thy command, 
Perfumes the air and paints the land ; 
The summer rays with vigor shine, 
To raise the corn and cheer the vine. 



4 Thy hand in autumn richly pours 
Through all our coasts redundant stores ; 
And winters, softened by Thy care, 

No more a face of horror wear. 

5 Seasons, and months, and weeks, and days, 
Demand successive songs of praise ; 

And be the grateful homage paid, 
With morning light and evening shade. 
Rev. Philip Doddridge, 1702-1751 




The Heavens Declare Thy Glory 



Timothy R. Matthews, 1855 



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Goes forth to chant Thy praise ; 
And moon-beams soft and tender 

Their gentler anthem raise ; 
O'er every tribe and nation 

That music strange is poured, 
The song of all creation 

To Thee, creation's Lord. 



3 All heaven on high rejoices 

To do its Maker's will ; 
The stars with solemn voices 

Resound Thy praises still; 
So let my whole behavior, 

Tho'ts, words and actions be, 
O Lord, my strength, my stronghold, 

One ceaseless song to Thee. 

Thomas R. Birks, 1874, verse 3, line 7, alt. 



153 



This is My Father's World 




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This is my Father's world, 

The birds their carols raise, 
The morning light, the lily white, 

Declare their Maker's praise. 
This is my Father's world, 

He shines in all that's fair; 
In the rustling grass I hear Him pass, 

He speaks to me everywhere. 



3 This is my Father's world, 
O let me ne'er forget 
That tho' the wrong seems oft so strong, 

God is the Ruler yet. 
This is my Father's world, 

Why should my heart be sad ? 
The Lord is King — let the heavens ring : 
God reigns : let the earth be glad. 
Maltbie D. Babcock, 1901, verse 3. lines 6, 7, 8, alt. 



Words copyright by Charles Scribner's Sons from Thoughts for Every Day Living. 
the Trustees of Presbyterian Board of Publication and Sabbath School Work. 



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154 



Lord of the Harvest 




1. Lord of the Har - vest, hear our praise For the fields of rip- ened grain. 

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Of thanksgiving for Thy care. 
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Love is shining everywhere. 



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Summer's heat and winter's hail, 
Seed-time or the harvest fair, 

Day or night, shall never fail — 
All proclaim Thy thoughtful care. 



155 



Luther 




Away In a Manger 



Martin Luther 



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The Baby awakes ; 
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I Love Thee, Lord Jesus; 
. Look down from the sky, 
And stay by my cradle 
Till morning is nigh. 

Martin Luther 1483-1546 



O Come, All Ye Faithful 

J. F. Wade's Cantus Diversi, 1751 





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Stille Nacht 



O Come, All Ye Faithful— Concluded 



2 Sing, choirs of angels, sing in exultation, 
Sing, all ye citizens of heav'n above; 
Glory to God in the highest: 

3 Yea, Lord we greet Thee, born this happy morning; 
Jesus, to Thee be glory giv'n; 

Word of the Father, now in flesh appearing: 

Anon, ( 18th cent.) Trans, by Rev. Frederick Oakley, 1841, alt. 



Franz Gruber, 1818 



Silent Night, Holy Night 



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Silent night, holy night, 
Shepherds quake at the sight, 
Glories stream from heaven afar, 
Heav'nly hosts sing Alleluia, 
Christ the Saviour is born, 
Christ the Saviour is born. 



3 Silent night, holy night, 
Son of God, love's pure light, 
Radiant beams from Thy holy face, 
With the dawn of redeeming grace, 
Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth, 
Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth. 

Joseph Mohr 



158 



Watchman, Tell Us of the Night 



Lowell Mason 



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2 Watchman, tell us of the night ; 

Higher yet that star ascends : 
Traveller, blessedness and light, 

Peace and truth, its course portends. 
Watchman, will its beams alone 

Gild the spot that gave them birth ? 
Traveller, ages are its own ; 

See it bursts o'er all the earth. 



Watchman, tell us of the night, 

For the morning seems to dawn : 
Traveller, darkness takes its flight ; 

Doubt and terror are withdrawn. 
Watchman, let thy wanderings cease ; 

Hie thee to thy quiet home. 
Traveller, lo, the Prince of Peace, 

Lo, the Son of God is come ! 

Sir John Bowring, 1825 



159 



God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand 



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2 Thy love divine hath led us in the past, 
In this free land by Thee our lot is cast; 
Be Thou our ruler, guardian, guide and stay, 
Thy word our law, Thy paths our chosen way. 

3 From war's alarms, from deadly pestilence, 
• Be Thy strong arm our ever sure defense; 

Thy true religion in our hearts increase, 
Thy bounteous goodness nourish us in peace. 

4 Refresh Thy people on their toilsome way, 
Lead us from night to never-ending day; 
Fill all our lives with love and grace divine, 
And glory, laud and praise be ever Thine. 



Daniel C. Roberts, 1876 



160 



Praise Him, Praise Him 




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3 Love Him, love Him, all ye little children, 

He is love. He is love; 
Love Him, love Him, all ye little children, 
He is love, He is love. 

4 Thank Him, thank Him, all ye little children, 

He is love, He is love; 
Thank Him, thank Him, all ye little children, 
He is love, He is love. 

5 Serve Him, serve Him, all ye little children, 

He is love, He is love; 
Serve Him, Serve Him, all ye little children, 
He is love, He is love. 



161 



4-4-S- 



To Think and Do Right 



C. Austin Miles 




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